Noah Lackstein

DLD NYC 14 - World in Transition II (Albert Wenger) (by DLDconference)

That’s when he realized the transformative potential of platforms such as Amazon and eBay: Most manufacturers used them as a place to sell, but they’re actually giantlaboratories. In the past, say, an audio company would have to make many speakers—otherwise, who would take them seriously? But on Amazon, the consumer doesn’t look at a brand’s full line of products; she looks at Amazon’s full line, meaning a tiny company with one speaker can compete against anyone. Pikarski’s buyers need only to figure out what features consumers want, and then produce them.

The Amazon Whisperer | Fast Company | Business Innovation

If investors wake up one day and think you are toast, you are indeed toast. When you generate cash, you can respond to silly requests from the capital markets the way Kanye would:

Excuse me, is you saying something?

Uh uh, you can’t tell me nothing

(Source: bhorowitz.com)

Around the corner

  Around the corner I have a friend,
  In this great city that has no end,
  Yet the days go by and weeks rush on,
  And before I know it, a year is gone.

  And I never see my old friends face,
  For life is a swift and terrible race,
  He knows I like him just as well,
  As in the days when I rang his bell.

  And he rang mine but we were younger then,
  And now we are busy, tired men.
  Tired of playing a foolish game,
  Tired of trying to make a name.

  "Tomorrow" I say! "I will call on Jim
  Just to show that I'm thinking of him",
  But tomorrow comes and tomorrow goes,
  And distance between us grows and grows.

  Around the corner, yet miles away,
  "Here's a telegram sir," "Jim died today."
  And that's what we get and deserve in the end.
  Around the corner, a vanished friend.

  -- Charles Hanson Towne
I very frequently get the question: ‘What’s going to change in the next 10 years?’ And that is a very interesting question; it’s a very common one. I almost never get the question: ‘What’s not going to change in the next 10 years?’ And I submit to you that that second question is actually the more important of the two — because you can build a business strategy around the things that are stable in time. … [I]n our retail business, we know that customers want low prices, and I know that’s going to be true 10 years from now. They want fast delivery; they want vast selection. It’s impossible to imagine a future 10 years from now where a customer comes up and says, ‘Jeff I love Amazon; I just wish the prices were a little higher,’ [or] ‘I love Amazon; I just wish you’d deliver a little more slowly.’ Impossible. And so the effort we put into those things, spinning those things up, we know the energy we put into it today will still be paying off dividends for our customers 10 years from now. When you have something that you know is true, even over the long term, you can afford to put a lot of energy into it.

The 20 Smartest Things Jeff Bezos Has Ever Said (AMZN)

It is not about building a smoother version of what already exists in the market. That is a transient advantage as existing companies adopt technology. If you want to build something big and lasting you have use the internet/mobile to do something that simply was not possible before.

Continuations: Reminder: Net Native Means Previously Impossible (via nickgrossman)

(via fred-wilson)

I see much deeper and broader reasons for learning to code. In the process of learning to code, people learn many other things. They are not just learning to code, they are coding to learn.

Mitch Resnick, MIT Media Lab, founder of Scratch

 Learn To Code, Code To Learn | EdSurge News

(via fred-wilson)

(via fred-wilson)

10 years ago I sat down with my brother. He was about to attend a high attrition special forces course.  The vast majority of candidates drop out.

Aren’t you concerned about the failure rate?

I still think about his answer: “Attrition is a group statistic. It doesn’t apply to me.”

He explained that statistics are created for groups, not for individuals. As an individual, its not relevant to you. He went on to pass the course on a broken ankle.

That makes me think about some startup founders. Their companies should have died, since most die. They should have given up, since most give up. But, somehow they willed their company to exist.

Startup failure is a group statistic, it doesn’t apply to you.

"Attrition is a group statistic. It don’t apply to me" - startup thoughts

Government is a hackable system — an operating system that can be optimized.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/24/nyregion/mayor-bloombergs-geek-squad.html?_r=0 (via wmougayar)